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Analyze the childhood world of Jem, Scout, and Dill and their relationship with Boo Radley in Part One. 2. How do Jem and Scout change during the course of the novel? How do they remain the same? 3. What is Atticus’s relationship to the rest of Maycomb? What is his role in the community? 4. Discuss the role of family in To Kill a Mockingbird, paying close attention to Aunt Alexandra. 5. Examine Miss Maudie’s relationship to the Finches and to the rest of Maycomb. 6. Discuss the author’s descriptions of Maycomb. What is the town’s role in the novel? 7.

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Analyze the author’s treatment of Boo Radley. What is his role in the novel? 1. Analyze the childhood world of Jem, Scout, and Dill and their relationship with Boo Radley in Part One. The children’s relationship with Boo in Part One is important in that this subplot sets the stage for the greater trial coming up in the adult world around them. Jem, Scout and Dill first have their own notions about Boo and none of them are very complimentary. They are drawn to him by a sort of morbid fascination which has been encouraged by all the hearsay going on about Boo’s domestic violence and night rambling.

They are prejudiced against Boo in the same way that the white community is prejudiced against Tom Robinson. Their attitude changes, however, when Boo patches up Jem’s pants, then leaves little presents in the hole in the tree. Boo takes the first step to be the children’s friend, even if it is only a “virtual” kind of way. The children’s attitude towards Boo Radley begins to change even if they still have a gut fear of him actually coming around. When he puts a blanket around Scout as she watches Miss Maudie’s house burn down, Jem and Scout are later in awe that they actually got that close.

They harbour some fear of him even if they are aware that he means them no harm. At the end of Part One, the reader can’t help but wonder if the children aren’t doing a better job at overcoming their unjustified fears and prejudice than the grownups in Maycomb. Also, a correlation arises between Boo and Tom, two innocent people ostracised and “found guilty” in the Deep South mind frame of the 1930s. 2. How do Jem and Scout change during the course of the novel? How do they remain the same? Jem becomes more mature.

He is still a boy at the end of the book, but he is working his way into manhood. This is shown through his reaction at the trial of Tom Robinson (he actually cries because of the injustice of the court) and also in the way he doesn’t want to play games with his younger sister (who he still sees as a child). Scout is still a child at the end of the novel, but she is being to see things from a different perspective. She begins to realize that things aren’t always what they appear to be (Boo Radley and Mrs. Dubose are both proof of that).

The above examples could be used in an essay, but if you’re talking about the actual structure of an essay I would suggest you set it up like this: Your introduction would mention your thesis (which would be to prove that Jem and Scout change/remain the same throughout the novel) and then very briefly discuss your three main examples that prove your thesis. Your body paragraph would discuss these examples in further detail. For example, you may want to compare and contrast Jem and Scout’s reaction to Mrs. Dubose and the lesson that both of them learned from her.

Your conclusion should reiterate what your essay discussed and possibly (depending upon what your teacher is looking for) give your own personal opinion. The structure of your essay also depends upon the assignment that you were given, but I hope this helps. 3. In To Kill a Mockingbird, what is Atticus’s relationship to the rest of Maycomb and what is his role in the community? Atticus is the Town of  general lawyer. He is an upstanding and respected member of the community raising his two children. When a friend is accused of the crime of murder, he defends him.

Because the man accused is Black, it causes problems for Atticus and the children with the community. In addition to being an attorney, Atticus is also Maycomb’s representative to the Alabama state legislature in Montgomery. Atticus runs unopposed each election, and this fact probably better illustrates his stature and importance to the town than any other single statement in To Kill a Mockingbird. People may not always agree with Atticus’ decisions, especially when he decides to defend a black man accused of raping a white woman, but the town knows they have no better man to represent them.

He is hand-picked by Judge Taylor for the important trial instead of the usual public defender, Maxwell Green, and the people know Atticus will do his best to prove Tom innocent. “… you know the court appointed him to defend this nigger. ”      “Yeah, but Atticus aims to defend him. That’s what I don’t like about it. ” Maudie explains to Jem that some people “… were born to do our unpleasant jobs for us. Your father’s one of them. ” Maudie adds that “We’re so rarely called on to be Christians, but when we are, we’ve got men like Atticus to go for us. Even Dolphus Raymond recognizes Atticus’ importance.

He tells Scout that “… you don’t know that your pa’s not a run-of-the-mill man, it’ll take a few years for that to sink in… ” And Atticus’ standing with the black community is evident: They stand in his honor following the trial and send him baskets of food as a way of thanking him for his staunch defense. 4. Discuss the role of family in To Kill a Mockingbird, paying close attention to Aunt Alexandra. Well the Finch family are what you could say the only family tolerant of other races this can be shown by how they treat Calpurnia and Tom Robinson.

However Aunt Alexandra is completely the opposite she is racist at one point she wanted to have Calpurnia fired because she was black. 5. What is Miss Maudie’s relationship to the Finches and the rest of Maycomb in To Kill a Mockingbird? First of all “Miss” Maudie Atkinson is not a spinster, like some of the other “Misses” that appear in To Kill a Mockingbird. (The children call her “Miss,” as they do some of the other women, as a sign of old-fashioned respect. ) Maudie is a widow, like Atticus, and the daughter of Dr.

Frank Buford, whose “profession was medicine. ” Dr. Buford was a neighboring landowner, and Maudie Buford had grown up near Finch’s Landing before moving to Maycomb. (Little, if nothing, else is mentioned about her husband, Mr. Atkinson, or the circumstances of his absence. ) She inherited her love of flowers and gardening from her father, whose obsession was anything that grew in the ground, so he stayed poor. Maudie had known Atticus and brother Jack Finch for at least four decades, and Jack had jokingly been asking Maudie to marry him for many years.

Maudie lives across the street from the Finches and serves as a mentor and confidante to the children, especially Scout, who had considerable faith in Miss Maudie. She had never told on us, had never played cat-and-mouse with us, she was not at all interested in our private lives. She was our friend. She is a true and loyal friend to Atticus as well, and she supports him and his legal decision to take on the case of Tom Robinson. She explains to the children that Atticus is no ordinary man, but one who the entire town counts upon. “… there are some men in this world who were born to do our unpleasant jobs for us.

Your father’s one of them… “We’re so rarely called on to be Christians, but when we are, we’ve got men like Atticus to go for us. ”  6. Discuss the author’s descriptions of Maycomb. What is the town’s role in the novel? Mycomb is an old town with old ideas. People operate “the way things have always been. ”  Everyone seems to have a set place that they are stuck in. Haverford is “a name synonymous with jackass. ”  So, no one trusts Haverfords. People are judged by their name, their race, or their religion and not as individuals. Tom is assumed to be guilty because he is black.

Atticus Finch challenges this thinking by telling the truth; the jury rejects him by convicting Tom anyway. Scout and Jem learn that people are individuals who deserve to be given a chance. Scout gives Arthur Radley a chance that few in Maycomb would give him, and she finds him to be a decent man. She also decides to be friends with Walter Cunninham even though Alexandra calls him trash just becaus he is poor. 7. Analyze the author’s treatment of Boo Radley. What is his role in the novel? This novel is slightly deceptive. You’d think the main theme would be racism, or that the focus of the book would be the trial.

It wasn’t. The focus was Scout’s journey from a child’s innocence to an adult’s wisdom. Nothing serves to better emphasize this than Boo Radley’s character. Boo Radley is a foil. In the beginning of the novel, he’s Scout’s only fear. He’s her boogeyman in the closet, and it isn’t until after she’s been exposed to the ugly reality of people that she realizes the real monsters are the anger and hate and racism residing in those around her. Her views of Boo in the beginning in comparison to her understanding of him by the end of the novel parallel her progression towards wisdom.

Really, Boo was never a monster. He gives her small presents, covers her the night of the fire. He’s a subtle force of good, but it’s almost as though he’s also invisible to all but those who can see racism for what it really is: a destructive and evil emotion. Those who aren’t racist understand Boo and know that he’s harmless. Those who’ve succumbed to racism and hate are afraid of him. His character exists to expose the ugliness in the townspeople. You could probably argue that he represents wisdom and compassion in its most pure form. How the author treated him?

I suppose you’re being asked to explain his function in comparison to how others viewed him. That would make for an interesting paper. I don’t know which level you’re at–college or junior high or high school–but if you’re sticking to a simple five paragraph format, you could write a paragraph on the negative views people have of him (focus on how his father behaves and what people say of him), then switch to the positive portrayal (Atticus’ and possibly Maddie’s views). For a third paragraph, you could trace the change in Scout’s opinion, how she feared him at first but then came to understand him as her own eyes were opened to racism.

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