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Assessment of the Wastage of Non-Renewable

Topic Assessment of the wastage of non-renewable resource (WATER) Objective A non-renewable resource is a natural resource which cannot be produced, grown, generated, or used on a scale which can sustain its consumption rate. These resources often exist in a fixed amount, or are consumed much faster than nature can create them. Fossil fuels (such as water, electricity, coal, petroleum and natural gas) and nuclear power (uranium) are examples.

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In contrast, resources such as timber (when harvested sustainably) or metals (which can be recycled) are considered renewable resources. In the universe of natural resources, minerals are unique in the sense of their non-renewable profile. Their deposits are finite, either physically or economically, and this implies a special concern about their exploitation, use, consumption, and recycling in a way that could prevent or mitigate their scarcity or unavailability for future generations.

The optimal use of resources implies the adoption of a rational classification according to two major factors: geological knowledge and confidence; and the consideration of mining, metallurgical, economic, marketing, legal, environmental, social, and governmental factors (the modifying factors). As a general rule, government action is applied to survey and identify resources, whereas private enterprises concentrate their effort on well-defined reserves. Introduction In the universe of natural resources, minerals are unique in the sense of their non-renewable profile.

Their deposits are finite, either physically or economically, and this implies a special concern about their exploitation, use, consumption, and recycling in a way that could prevent or mitigate their scarcity or unavailability for future generations. The optimal use of resources implies the adoption of a rational classification according to two major factors: geological knowledge and confidence; and the consideration of mining, metallurgical, economic, marketing, legal, environmental, social, and governmental factors (the modifying factors).

As a general rule, government action is applied to survey and identify resources, whereas private enterprises concentrate their effort on well-defined reserves. As technology advances, non-conventional sources of minerals could enter into the marketplace, as shown by current research on seawater, seabed nodules, and ultimately space mining, all of which may occupy some place in the supply of minerals for the future generations. Methodology With water wastage in urban areas becoming a cause for concern, environmental activists have stepped up their demand for the reinvention of flush toilet.

At present, a standard flush toilet uses nine to 10 litres of water every time the cistern is pushed down. But, environmentalists dub it a massive wastage of water and argue that flushing does not require more than five-six litres. Hence, the emphasis is on developing flush toilets with minimal usage of water. Giving thrust to establishment of water treatment plants across the country, Sunita said: “Out of the 33,200 million litres of sewage discharged per day in the country, only 4,400 million litres is treated. That means only 13. per cent of the country’s total sewage is treated. ” Area of Study As the globe’s temperature rises and the earth’s weather patterns go haywire, water is quickly becoming a hot topic in the world. Floods are sweeping through new areas, while others are drying out faster than ever. We’ve long had the luxury of holding a cavalier attitude about the water we use, and more often than not that attitude has led us to unnecessary waste and pollution of our water. Water in Life: Water makes up 50 to 90 percent of the weight of living things.

Protoplasm is a solution of water and fats, carbohydrates, proteins, and salts. Water transports, combines, and chemically breaks down these substances. Water also aids the metabolic breakdown of proteins and carbohydrates. Natural Water Cycle: The continuous movement of water between the earth and the atmosphere is the hydrological cycle. Water vapor from water and land surfaces and from living cells circulates through the atmosphere and falls as rain or snow. When it reaches the earth, water either flows into streams and then into oceans or lakes, or it enters, or infiltrates the soil.

Some water becomes soil moisture, which may evaporate directly or move up through the roots of plants and be released by leaves. Some water percolates downward, accumulating in the so-called zone of saturation to form the groundwater reservoir, the upper surface of which is the water table. Under natural conditions, the water table rises in response to inflowing water and then declines as water drains into natural outlets such as wells and springs. Occurrence: Water is the only substance that occurs at ordinary temperatures in all three states of matter: solid, liquid, and gas.

As a solid, ice, it forms glaciers, frozen lakes and rivers, snow, hail, and frost. It is liquid as rain and dew, and it covers three-quarters of the earth’s surface in swamps, lakes, rivers, and oceans. Water also occurs in the soil and beneath the earth’s surface as a vast groundwater reservoir. As gas, or water vapor, it occurs as fog, steam, and clouds. Water Purification: Impurities are removed from water by screening, sedimentation, filtration, chlorination, or irradiation. See also Sewage Disposal.

Aeration saturates water with air, usually by spraying fountains of water into the air. Aeration removes odors and tastes caused by decomposing organic matter, industrial wastes, and some gases. Various salts and metals cause hardness in water. Hardness may be removed by boiling, by adding sodium carbonate and lime, or by filtering through natural or artificial zeolites. Processes, which involve evaporating salt water and then condensing the resulting steam, are known as multiple-effect evaporation, vapor-compression distillation, and flash evaporation.

Freezing is another desalinization method, based on the different freezing points of fresh and salt water. Ice crystals are separated from the salt brine, washed, and melted into fresh water. In reverse osmosis, pressure forces fresh water through a membrane that does not allow minerals to pass. In electrodialysis, the positive and negative ions of the dissolved salt are removed from water by an electric current through special membranes. These fine drinking water systems reduce a wide range of contaminants of health concern for a low cost per gallon.

The superior effectiveness of solid carbon block systems is confirmed by testing and certification by NSF International; independent laboratory tests; certification by the State of California Department of Health Services; and more importantly, by the more than two million satisfied customers throughout the world. The performance of the solid carbon block filter technology exceeds that of all other filter types and meets only the highest standards for quality! At work Report dripping taps to the Building Services helpdesk on extension 9898 – a dripping tap can waste 10 000 litres (3,000 gallons) of water a year;  • Don’t forget to turn the tap off properly after washing your hands. A dripping tap wastes 30 drops of water per minute and 380 litres (84 gallons) per month – this equates to 4,600 litres (1,008 gallons) per year. At home • Fit insulation to water pipework – running taps waiting for them to get hot can waste a lot of water; • If you have an older or larger cistern, save water during flushes by filling a plastic bottle or bag with water and carefully placing it in the cistern.

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